Club Scion tC

Image Issues Fixed
We made some changes when migrating the site from one AWS account to another, and this resulted in some ill-configured images in various parts of the site. We have fixed the problem. You may need to clear browser cache to fix the issue.

Sorry for the inconvenience!
Forum Utilities
Viewing Thread

Issue with Starting

  • 7 posts
  • Page 1 of 1
  • 1
    So I have been having an interesting issue with my car for a while now.

    My 2006 tC's starting is not consistent. It will start slowly whenever it's hot outside or it may have been sitting there for a while. I have changed the alternator, starter, battery, and fuel pump.

    As of right now, it starts slowly but the clicking during ignition is consistent and of the same volume. When the engine finally turns over, it turns over quickly and without hiccups. The alternator charges the battery without any problems.

    At this point, the only suggestions left from some of the people I know is changing the fuel pressure regulator. My mechanic friend's reasoning is that if the ignition clicking is consistent, there is no problem with the parts mentioned. The pressure regulator is not regulating pressure effectively anymore so the pump has to run longer before the fuel line pressure is where it needs to be for the proper turn over.

    I have run parasitic draw tests on the battery and only get about 250 mA readings.

    I don't really know what else to do besides taking into a shop to have them fix this for me but I would rather do it myself and know it was done correctly.

    Any ideas?
    mourneris wrote:
    So I have been having an interesting issue with my car for a while now.

    My 2006 tC's starting is not consistent. It will start slowly whenever it's hot outside or it may have been sitting there for a while. I have changed the alternator, starter, battery, and fuel pump.

    As of right now, it starts slowly but the clicking during ignition is consistent and of the same volume. When the engine finally turns over, it turns over quickly and without hiccups. The alternator charges the battery without any problems.

    At this point, the only suggestions left from some of the people I know is changing the fuel pressure regulator. My mechanic friend's reasoning is that if the ignition clicking is consistent, there is no problem with the parts mentioned. The pressure regulator is not regulating pressure effectively anymore so the pump has to run longer before the fuel line pressure is where it needs to be for the proper turn over.

    I have run parasitic draw tests on the battery and only get about 250 mA readings.

    I don't really know what else to do besides taking into a shop to have them fix this for me but I would rather do it myself and know it was done correctly.

    Any ideas?


    yes, replace the spark plugs with what is supposed to be in there. NGK part 4589, laser iridium. And sometimes aftermarket starters do not start the car the way it was designed. Lots of cheap aftermarket parts out there.

    why throw parts at it? Test the fuel pressure, easy to do. See if the fuel pump is keeping the correct pressure.
    • Edited 1 times, last by mourneris on .
    sciontc_mich wrote:
    mourneris wrote:
    So I have been having an interesting issue with my car for a while now.

    My 2006 tC's starting is not consistent. It will start slowly whenever it's hot outside or it may have been sitting there for a while. I have changed the alternator, starter, battery, and fuel pump.

    As of right now, it starts slowly but the clicking during ignition is consistent and of the same volume. When the engine finally turns over, it turns over quickly and without hiccups. The alternator charges the battery without any problems.

    At this point, the only suggestions left from some of the people I know is changing the fuel pressure regulator. My mechanic friend's reasoning is that if the ignition clicking is consistent, there is no problem with the parts mentioned. The pressure regulator is not regulating pressure effectively anymore so the pump has to run longer before the fuel line pressure is where it needs to be for the proper turn over.

    I have run parasitic draw tests on the battery and only get about 250 mA readings.

    I don't really know what else to do besides taking into a shop to have them fix this for me but I would rather do it myself and know it was done correctly.

    Any ideas?


    yes, replace the spark plugs with what is supposed to be in there. NGK part 4589, laser iridium. And sometimes aftermarket starters do not start the car the way it was designed. Lots of cheap aftermarket parts out there.

    why throw parts at it? Test the fuel pressure, easy to do. See if the fuel pump is keeping the correct pressure.


    Haven't done the test yet but to add to sciontc_mich's post.

    The spark plugs can be found in packs of 6 on Amazon or as individuals at places like AutoZone

    To check fuel pressure, follow the instructions in the tC Gen. 1 service manuals (one is linked for convenience)

    Main fuel line is behind the engine and connected to the fuel injectors. This area is blocked by the intake assembly and would require removing the assembly to access it. If you're willing to do that, go ahead.
    mourneris wrote:
    sciontc_mich wrote:
    mourneris wrote:
    So I have been having an interesting issue with my car for a while now.

    My 2006 tC's starting is not consistent. It will start slowly whenever it's hot outside or it may have been sitting there for a while. I have changed the alternator, starter, battery, and fuel pump.

    As of right now, it starts slowly but the clicking during ignition is consistent and of the same volume. When the engine finally turns over, it turns over quickly and without hiccups. The alternator charges the battery without any problems.

    At this point, the only suggestions left from some of the people I know is changing the fuel pressure regulator. My mechanic friend's reasoning is that if the ignition clicking is consistent, there is no problem with the parts mentioned. The pressure regulator is not regulating pressure effectively anymore so the pump has to run longer before the fuel line pressure is where it needs to be for the proper turn over.

    I have run parasitic draw tests on the battery and only get about 250 mA readings.

    I don't really know what else to do besides taking into a shop to have them fix this for me but I would rather do it myself and know it was done correctly.

    Any ideas?


    yes, replace the spark plugs with what is supposed to be in there. NGK part 4589, laser iridium. And sometimes aftermarket starters do not start the car the way it was designed. Lots of cheap aftermarket parts out there.

    why throw parts at it? Test the fuel pressure, easy to do. See if the fuel pump is keeping the correct pressure.


    Haven't done the test yet but to add to sciontc_mich's post.

    The spark plugs can be found in packs of 6 on Amazon or as individuals at places like AutoZone

    To check fuel pressure, follow the instructions in the tC Gen. 1 service manuals (one is linked for convenience)

    Main fuel line is behind the engine and connected to the fuel injectors. This area is blocked by the intake assembly and would require removing the assembly to access it. If you're willing to do that, go ahead.


    I'm confused, you're giving yourself advice for your own question??
    If someone else is having this issue and they find this thread, they'll have access to the resources mentioned or others which may prove helpful. Standard fare for technical help forums last time I checked.
    • Edited 2 times, last by mourneris on .
    Problem has been resolved: Spark plug gaps were all smaller than specification (0.043" or 43 mils).

    Solution: Given the original issues posted about, here is my proposed solutions. Due to the inconvenient placement of the main fuel line, there is another way to verify whether the fuel pressure regulator and/or pump are at fault. Over about a dozen iterations, one should turn the ignition into the "ON" position for about 10 seconds. This will prime the fuel pump and therefore the fuel line. If there is any issue with either the regulator or the pump, this within itself should fix the symtomology (slow starting, etc.) as the pump/regulator will have enough time to properly prep the fuel lines and pressure despite their worn/broken state.

    In my case, despite priming of the fuel line under varied temperature conditions, the car still started slowly and inconsistently. Additionally, more symptoms began pointing to the spark plugs being at fault including (1) gas mileage impacted and (2) rougher idle than usual.

    When your starting is bad, inspect your spark plugs. Chrisfix has an amazing video on the subject and you can use a [url="]cheap gap checker from Amazon[/url]

    MOD EDIT: DO NOT USE A TYPICAL SPARK PLUG GAP TOOL ON IRIDIUM TIPPED SPARK PLUGS - use feeling gauges otherwise you can break the iridium tip
    OP EDIT: Example of feeler gauges can be seen here.
    If the spark plugs are the issue, replace them and go on about your day. However, if you find oil on the spark plugs (which I did), your valve head gasket is shot and you will need a replacement (there is also a video for this).

    Only once all these issues have been checked, you may want to actually go check the fuel pump and regulator assemblies.
    mourneris wrote:
    Problem has been resolved: Spark plug gaps were all smaller than specification (0.043" or 43 mils).

    Solution: Given the original issues posted about, here is my proposed solutions. Due to the inconvenient placement of the main fuel line, there is another way to verify whether the fuel pressure regulator and/or pump are at fault. Over about a dozen iterations, one should turn the ignition into the "ON" position for about 10 seconds. This will prime the fuel pump and therefore the fuel line. If there is any issue with either the regulator or the pump, this within itself should fix the symtomology (slow starting, etc.) as the pump/regulator will have enough time to properly prep the fuel lines and pressure despite their worn/broken state.

    In my case, despite priming of the fuel line under varied temperature conditions, the car still started slowly and inconsistently. Additionally, more symptoms began pointing to the spark plugs being at fault including (1) gas mileage impacted and (2) rougher idle than usual.

    When your starting is bad, inspect your spark plugs. Chrisfix has an amazing video on the subject and you can use a [url="]cheap gap checker from Amazon[/url]

    MOD EDIT: DO NOT USE A TYPICAL SPARK PLUG GAP TOOL ON IRIDIUM TIPPED SPARK PLUGS - use feeling gauges otherwise you can break the iridium tip
    If the spark plugs are the issue, replace them and go on about your day. However, if you find oil on the spark plugs (which I did), your valve head gasket is shot and you will need a replacement (there is also a video for this).

    Only once all these issues have been checked, you may want to actually go check the fuel pump and regulator assemblies.


    Glad to hear that you found the solution to your problems. Yup, not to sound arrogant at all, but it's what I recommend you look at. That's been the typical problem with the 2az-fe engine on the tc. We really haven't seen a lot of starters or fuel pump problems on the tC. Sure, here and there it could happen but it's not common. Spark plugs definitely affect the starting.

    I also had to modify your post for others, you're right about checking the gap, but feeler gauges would be best since it's very easy to break the iridium tip off the plug.

    Oh and we appreciate (here at CTSC) more info to a problem, yes it definitely helps anyone searching for an issue. Thanks for the update!
  • 7 posts
  • Page 1 of 1
  • 1
Jump to Forum:
Related Threads
Threads
Replies
Views
Last Post
©2019 Club Scion tC - Social Network for Scion enthusiasts.